Tag Archives: homicide

Malta Firearms Conference – Sending the Message!

The Conference organized by FESAC, AACTS, AMACS and Firearms United in Malta has attracted media attention – in addition to hall full of firearms enthusiasts and foreign guests from many organizations in Europe!

Nothing in the directive is yet settled, and even the trilogue is still formally ongoing before the parliament approves the current “compromise”. Malta is in key position, because they are taking over EU presidency for the next six months and one of the more challenging areas is the new firearms directive proposal, so the conference was an excellent event, where the message from the shooters was sent to the authorities – loud and clear.

The Maltese organizations spared no effort or expense setting up the conference on saturday, and as you can see from the pictures, they had even organized an exhibit where they showed priceless historical artifacts that were originally sentenced to be destroyed by the commission.

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FIREARMS UNITED’s Answers to EU

On our BACKGROUND page we list all interesting informations and arguments against the EU gunban. Feel free to read our reports and answers and use the arguments when you write to or call your politician or talk to a journalist.

Ours answers to EU

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#EUgunban: COM has no facts, but misuses massacres and lies

When MEP Beatrix von Storch asked the European Commission (COM) to prove the “dangerousness” of legally-held firearms and especially of category B firearms Commissioner Elżbieta Bieńkowska did not answer her question at all. She only gave examples and assumptions and misused massacres as an argument for bans.

Questions by Beatrix von Storch (MEP) from January 2016:

How many of the annual 1 000 (or 10 000 over the last decade) firearms-related homicides have been committed using legally held firearms or stolen firearms that previously belonged to legal owners? Please report figures for the last 10 years, broken down by firearms category A, B, C, D, and by Member State.

How many weapons transformed into automatic firearms that had previously been registered as semi-automatic firearms for law-abiding gun owners have been misused in the last 10 years? Please report figures by Member State and by category B1 to B7.

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FIREARMS UNITED’s Answer to the European Commission

FIREARMS UNITED commented and critized the 3 studies and arguments of the European Commission

  • cropped-001_LOGO_FU_WCGO.jpgMissing Impact Assessement
  • 10.000 homicides
  • Risk of legal ownership
  • 500 000 “stolen” firearms
  • Deactivated firearms
  • Conversions of semi-automatic firearms

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Foto: Photo: Reuters, EPA, ČTK

How to decrease firearms-related death?

Findings of the study which wants to combat illicit trafficking and to decrease firearms-related deaths and intimidation of victims

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Longtime-homicides

Long-Term Historical Trends in Violent Crime

Manuel Eisner is a Professor of Comparative and Developmental Criminology and Deputy Director of the University of Cambridge Institute of Criminology. He studied the history of crime from the thirteenth century until the end of the twentieth. This is a very short summary about his extraordinary work, which is published by the Department of Sociology at the University of Calgary.

Historical Trends between 1300 and 2000

The sudden decline in homicide [1630 to 1800) did not correlate with improved economic circumstances, stronger courts, or better policing.

Declines in homicide rates primarily resulted from some degree of pacification of encounters in public space, a reluctance to engage in physical confrontation over conflicts, and the waning of honour as a cultural code regulating everyday behaviour.

[A] large number of recent survey studies find that violence is correlated with low autonomy, unstable self-esteem, a high dependence on recognition by others, and limited competence in coping with conflict.

Historical Trends between 1300 and 2000

The data suggest a dramatic drop in the fifteenth century and in the twentieth century. The first drop may reflect missing or different sources. For the second drop medical technology have had a major impact. Deaths which occur within the first two hours after the injury may not be cured by modern medical treatment. But most of the deaths occurring after twenty-four hours can now be prevented.

The European countries developed differently In the nineteenth century: The highly industrialized countries of northern Europe, including Germany and France, had low homicide rates and were surrounded by a ring of high-homicide countries: Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greece, Finland and all eastern European countries.

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